Anne Percoco

New Growth

For New Growth, Percoco will integrate eight images of trees from local yellow pages advertisements into the real landscape on Randall’s Island Park. She envisions these as two-dimensional shapes, between 4’-7’ tall and 3’-4’ wide, installed along the Island’s southern end. The fake trees will provide similar benefits to Park visitors as real trees do: shade and aesthetic appeal. However, the use of chemically-treated wood for a sculpture of a tree is clearly ironic, using a similar conceptual mechanism as Magritte’s famous Treachery of Images, but adding another layer: the identity of the material. This project will call attention to the artifice of parks as some of the only “natural” settings one encounters in a city. As Robert Smithson wrote, “The authentic artist cannot turn his back on the contradictions that inhabit our landscape.”

The Blog

New Growth Documentation

All photos by Tsubasa Berg.

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Details

One of the things that's lost when seeing art via the internet is being able to see tiny details and the texture of the object. These details are one of my favorite things about my FLOW piece. In the more detailed images, the way the graphics were converted to vectors is really cool -- the image gets broken up into shapes of solid colors. In most of the trees, you can see the grain of the plywood through the translucent paint or ink.

These photos are by Tsubasa Berg.

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New Growth Installation

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Hand Painting

Chris is hand painting two of the most graphically simple trees. The process is this: 1. Project image onto plywood 2. Trace 3. Make stencil with blue tape while watching Law & Order 4. Paint 5. Remove tape
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Site Sketch

Click image to enlarge.

The Artist

Anne Percoco(b. 1982, Boston, Massachusetts)

Anne Percoco makes art not by creating something new, but by reorganizing what’s already there. Her process is resourceful, responsive, and playful. She spends as much time exploring, collecting materials, and researching as she does making. She makes full use of each material’s unique formal properties as well as historical, cultural and environmental resonances. She makes both public and gallery-based work, learning different things from each. She studied at Drew University, Madison, NJ (BA 2005) and Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (MFA 2008).

For More Information

Website: annepercoco.com